Comedy Podcast | The Comedy Cast with English Comedian Andy Storey

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Hello and welcome back to The Comedy Cast; today you’ll be hearing from English stand-up comedian Andy Storey.

We get straight in the Edinburgh Fringe stuff and speak about the show he’s putting on with Maddie Campion, Epoch.

Andy’s the first ‘clean comedian’ we’ve had on so I was really interested to get to ask him some questions about clean comedy and how he sees it as being more difficult to be both funny and clean and how he enjoys the challenge of it.

We chat about how recently he was compared to Vic Reeves and Alan Bennett and how comparisons like that make him feel.

We speak about what he’s learned over the years from putting on shows at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

We talk then about the kinds of existential questions that come to comedians when they’re performing; do the audience care; why am I bearing my life and soul to people I don’t know who I’ll never see again, deep things like that.

We chat then for a minute about the the depths of the subconscious and how you can’t even trust your own mind as it’s always playing tricks. And it’s always good to keep grounded by reminding yourself that everything is meaningless really.

We talk about why he loves gigging so much, doing 5-nights-a-week as much as he can, honing his material at Open Mic nights and New Material nights around London.

We speak about that god-awful phrase ‘the comedy voice’ and how Andy has learned over the years to be more like himself on stage. He sees less of a difference between who he is on stage and who he is in real life.

We talk for a bit then about how Andy likes to challenge himself by constantly testing out new material, knowing that he cannot rely on trusted material he has to push his stage presence, his charisma and get his new ideas across well to the audience to get them laughing.

We natter too about the importance of language in joke, how particular words at particular times can completely change how an audience laughs, he speak about using the phrase ‘hipster hairdressers’ instead of ‘hair salon’ and how the reaction of the audience was totally different.

We speak about why some people need a push to get into things and how it took him so long to get into comedy even though he’d always wanted to do it.

Andy Storey
Andy Storey
Andy Storey

Hello and welcome back to The Comedy Cast; today you’ll be hearing from English stand-up comedian Andy Storey.

We get straight in the Edinburgh Fringe stuff and speak about the show he’s putting on with Maddie Campion, Epoch.

Andy’s the first ‘clean comedian’ we’ve had on so I was really interested to get to ask him some questions about clean comedy and how he sees it as being more difficult to be both funny and clean and how he enjoys the challenge of it.

We chat about how recently he was compared to Vic Reeves and Alan Bennett and how comparisons like that make him feel.

We speak about what he’s learned over the years from putting on shows at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

We talk then about the kinds of existential questions that come to comedians when they’re performing; do the audience care; why am I bearing my life and soul to people I don’t know who I’ll never see again, deep things like that.

We chat then for a minute about the the depths of the subconscious and how you can’t even trust your own mind as it’s always playing tricks. And it’s always good to keep grounded by reminding yourself that everything is meaningless really.

We talk about why he loves gigging so much, doing 5-nights-a-week as much as he can, honing his material at Open Mic nights and New Material nights around London.

We speak about that god-awful phrase ‘the comedy voice’ and how Andy has learned over the years to be more like himself on stage. He sees less of a difference between who he is on stage and who he is in real life.

We talk for a bit then about how Andy likes to challenge himself by constantly testing out new material, knowing that he cannot rely on trusted material he has to push his stage presence, his charisma and get his new ideas across well to the audience to get them laughing.

We natter too about the importance of language in joke, how particular words at particular times can completely change how an audience laughs, he speak about using the phrase ‘hipster hairdressers’ instead of ‘hair salon’ and how the reaction of the audience was totally different.

We speak about why some people need a push to get into things and how it took him so long to get into comedy even though he’d always wanted to do it.

Andy Storey’s Edinburgh Dates: Epoch & Keeping it Clean

Andy’s Website: here

Andy’s Twitter: here

Andy’s Instagram: here

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